Small Fry - Lisa Brennan-Jobs

Small Fry

Small Fry By Lisa Brennan-Jobs

  • Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Our rating: 5/5 stars

4 Score: 4 (From 72 Ratings)

Small Fry read description and reviews

Book ➲ "Small Fry" Audiobook ➲ "Small Fry"

A frank, smart and captivating memoir by the daughter of Apple founder Steve Jobs.

Born on a farm and named in a field by her parents—artist Chrisann Brennan and Steve Jobs—Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s childhood unfolded in a rapidly changing Silicon Valley. When she was young, Lisa’s father was a mythical figure who was rarely present in her life. As she grew older, her father took an interest in her, ushering her into a new world of mansions, vacations, and private schools. His attention was thrilling, but he could also be cold, critical and unpredictable. When her relationship with her mother grew strained in high school, Lisa decided to move in with her father, hoping he’d become the parent she’d always wanted him to be.

Small Fry is Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s poignant story of childhood and growing up. Scrappy, wise, and funny, young Lisa is an unforgettable guide, marveling at the particular magic of growing up in this family, in this place and time, while grappling with her feelings of illegitimacy and shame. Part portrait of a complex family, part love letter to California in the seventies and eighties, Small Fry is an enthralling story by an insightful new literary voice.

Small Fry book review; Small Fry book description; Lisa Brennan-Jobs; Biographies & Memoirs books

Posted Reviews

  • Small Fry

    5
    By Moody T
    Extremely poignant book A lot of soul all around, even with all the emotional clashes And the ability to see things as they are, and proof that even geniuses are human and necessarily flawed
  • Honest

    5
    By Gracious1024+
    This story comes across as very honest- her father is a genius, but deeply flawed. And the author’s memories come alive...her story feels like your own.
  • Money grab

    1
    By StopSpamTexts
    $25.99 for an ebook? I don’t think so. And one more thing... make it $9.99 (reasonably priced).
  • Small Fry

    5
    By Carmel Pars
    On these pages I found myself, a young girl feeling misplaced, with family and people that are supposed to love you, confused by unspoken and undefined behaviors, wanting desperately to change a world beyond your change as a child. I marvel at the strength of Lisa Brennen-Jobs and the fortitude to withstand the isolation and loneliness of her young life. I am stunned by the flow and beauty of the writing and am left wondering how powerful all that pain must have been to now move this writer across these pages to so move all of us privileged to read them. Carmel Parsons
  • Small Fry

    4
    By SugarCreekgal
    If you’re interested in Steve Jobs, read this book. If you are interested in family dynamics, read this book.
  • The beloved daughter

    5
    By Clau Salgado
    It’s clear through this story that Steve Jobs was a lost soul. He was deeply hurt when he felt “rejected” by his biological parents and carried that chip on his shoulder all his life. He wanted to succeed to prove to the world that he could make it despite having been rejected as a baby, but in the process, he demanded unconditional love, affection and loyalty that he wasn’t willing to reciprocate. So much so that that he was like a black hole, sucking in everything, giving nothing. Lisa was somebody that existed despite him. He didn’t decide on her existence and he resented her fo that. He was impossible cruel and unfair to her, but she always loved him and waited for him to love her back. At the end, too late maybe, he acknowledged how much he loved her, how much she was his beloved daughter. All was worth at the end. Of all his creations, Lisa (not the computer, the girl) was the real masterpiece.
  • Unbelievable (really)

    1
    By MollySage
    This book is hard to read because the author is telling stories from when she was 2 and 3 at the beginning. I don’t buy it and wish I hadn’t bought it.
  • Unbelievable (really)

    1
    By MollySage
    This book is hard to read because the author is telling stories from when she was 2 and 3 at the beginning. I don’t buy it and wish I hadn’t bought it.

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